Sunday, July 13, 2008

My First Geology Tool

I'm finally getting back to the first Brunton I ever used, an old K+E given to my dad by my mom when he graduated from college with his geology degree.

brunton closedBrunton on eastward-dipping Cambrian-Precambrian Prospect Mountain Quartzite (or possibly it's part of the Precambrian McCoy Creek Group).

brunton case Case for said Brunton sitting on the same outcrop. Coconino, what do you think - Prospect Mountain Quartzite? Anyone else have an opinion?

brunton on lineationsThe same Brunton resting parallel to lineations in mylonitic quartzite within 100 feet of the previous outcrop.

brunton on quartzite A more photogenic picture of the same Brunton sitting on a nearby quartzite outcrop.

outcrop with mountainLocation of the last two outcrop photos, on the whitish eastward-dipping quartzite seen in the foreground, with Wheeler Peak in the background.

2 comments:

coconino said...

I don't quite recollect what the structure in the Southern Snake Range is like, so my best guess based on where you likely were and the (relatively) unaltered state of the formations at Wheeler Peak is that the outcrops were something out of the McCoy Group. If that isn't a SWAG, I don't know what is. Of course, I've been driving thru northern AZ and southern Utah all day with a 4-year old (just got back home), so my mind is about as close to mush as it gets. I do hope to post some photos in the next couple of days. Like you noted in your previous post, it was quite hazy over my travels as well. I hear its from the Cal fires.

Silver Fox said...

Thanks for the SWAG (I had to look that one up!) The only map I have shows CZpm, and the mylonitic stuff does look like that, but the other, light greenish gray, almost slaty stuff looked a little different than my memory of the CZpm - so maybe it is Zmc (McCoy Creek Group).

You have such a busy schedule this summer, it sounds like. Hope the drive was at least scenic!